Can incidents related to SpiceJet be set aside?

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It’s not every day that the Directorate General of Civil Aviation, India’s aviation safety regulator, issues an excuse notice to an airline for allegedly failing to establish “safe, efficient and reliable air services.”

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One such ad went to SpiceJet on Wednesday. The Ajay Singh-led airline has been involved in nine aviation security incidents since May 1.

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Three of them were reported on July 5 alone, which included a flight diversion to Karachi. On July 2, another SpiceJet plane returned to Delhi due to smoke in the cabin. Meanwhile, a Vistara plane suffered an engine problem after landing in Delhi from Bangkok on July 6.

speaking to commercial standardsaid Capt. Amit Singh, an aviation security expert, there has been a general increase in incidents in the last 6 months. We have seen accidents with training planes, light aircraft and helicopters. But the Indian aviation industry is apparently content to do the bare minimum.

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The DGCA said a review of several incidents involving SpiceJet aircraft since April 1 showed “the aircraft returned to its station of origin or continued to land at the destination with degraded safety margins.”

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In response, SpiceJet said all of its planes were audited a month ago by the regulator and found to be safe. Ajay Singh said that many of these incidents are trivial in nature and happen to all airlines.

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DGCA chief Arun Kumar also said that around 30 flight incidents happen every day in the country and most of them have no safety implications. However, the strong words used by the DGCA in its notification to SpiceJet have set off the alarm.

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A review of the incidents by the watchdog showed “poor internal security oversight and inadequate maintenance actions” by the airline.

During a financial review of the airline in September, it found that SpiceJet’s suppliers were not being paid regularly, leading to a shortage of spare parts.


Captain Amit Singh said the DGCA’s comments on SpiceJet highlight systemic failure. The regulator’s action comes too late, he said, adding that the DGCA has regulations in place, but the problem is implementation.

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Last month, the DGCA suspended the operations of two flight training schools due to serious safety concerns, including an unsafe runway and dysfunctional fuel gauges on aircraft.

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However, Indian civil aviation currently enjoys the highest safety rating from the US Federal Aviation Authority. India will reportedly retain the Category I rating as the FAA completed its latest DGCA audit in April. .

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In 2014, when the FAA downgraded India’s safety ratings, Indian airlines such as Jet Airways and Air India faced multiple restrictions, including a ban on expanding flights to the US, while their existing flights faced additional checks.

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The International Civil Aviation Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations, is also expected to conduct an audit of India’s aviation security readiness later this year.

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In recent years, India has been increasingly talked about as having an international transit hub like Dubai. Furthermore, India is projected to become the third largest aviation market in terms of passengers by 2024. All this means more passengers and flights, making it doubly urgent to find a lasting solution to flight safety issues.

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