Nick Kyrgios admits spitting in the direction of an abusive fan during Wimbledon first-round win, questions ‘old’ linesman | tennis news


Nick Kyrgios gave an explosive post-match press conference on Tuesday

Nick Kyrgios admitted to spitting in the direction of an abusive fan while giving an explosive post-match news conference on Tuesday.

Kyrgios criticized Wimbledon’s abusive fans and questioned the age of the linesmen after reaching the second round with a 3-6 6-1 7-5 6-7 (3-7) 7 win -5 over British number 8 Paul Jubb.

In response to a reporter’s question, which stated, “In the end, you seemed to spit in the direction of…” Kyrios replied, “From one of the people who disrespected me, yes. I wouldn’t be doing that to someone”. who supported me.”

He added, “I’ve been dealing with hate and negativity for a long time, so I don’t feel like I owe that person anything.

“He literally came to the game to not even support anyone, just to draw disrespect. It’s fine, but if I give it back to you, that’s how it is.”

Kyrgios said he was not racially abused during the match but continued to criticize the crowd in general and the influence of social media in emboldening “negativity.”

“There was a lot of disrespect today,” Kyrgios said. “And I’m starting to think it’s normal, when it really isn’t.

“I didn’t say anything to the crowd until they started, every time I went down to the other end, I just went. I don’t know if it’s normal or not.”

The Australian world number 40 added: “I love this tournament. It has nothing to do with Wimbledon, I just think it’s just a whole generation of people, on social media, feeling like they have the right to comment on everything with negativity.” It just continues in real life.

“There’s a fence there, and physically I can’t do anything or say anything because I’ll get in trouble, so they feel like they can say whatever they want.”

Kyrgios also spoke of his frustration over a fiery exchange with a linesman during the match, with the 27-year-old remaining steadfast in his criticism of the “old man”.

“I said most referees are older and I just don’t think that’s ideal, when you play a sport with such small margins,” Kyrgios said.

“In fact, younger people have better eyesight. Don’t you think that’s appropriate?

“When you play a sport for hundreds and thousands of dollars, don’t you think we should have people who are really ready to call or get the ball out?

“That specific: I hit a ball inside, the old man called him. He was inside. Arguably if the guy was 40 years old, he may not have said that. In that case, he was wrong.”

British number eight Paul Jubb pushed Nick Kyrgios all the way in their first-round match, taking it to five sets.

British number eight Paul Jubb pushed Nick Kyrgios all the way in their first-round match, taking it to five sets.

Kyrgios hit 30 aces and made 55 unforced errors in his hard-fought victory, with the 22-year-old Jubb pushing him as far as five sets.

Earlier, in his on-pitch interview, Kyrgios paid tribute to the young Briton and also touched on his disappointment with the crowd.

“Unbelievably tough,” he said. “Obviously he is a local wild card, he had nothing to lose, he played the moment and he played exceptional tennis.

“(The) crowd was pretty loud today, a couple of people in the crowd weren’t afraid to criticize me. That was for you. You know who you are.”

What Kyrgios said in an explosive press conference

Reporter: Sorry to walk off the tennis court. Pretty serious question. Was he racially abused in court?

NK: Not today, no, no. But today there was a lot of disrespect being thrown from the crowd. I’m starting to think it’s normal when it really isn’t. You know, I didn’t say anything to the crowd until they started every time I went down to the other end, people just walked away. I don’t know if it’s normal or not.

Reporter: How does that make you feel when you feel that? Lots of people like you here. Is this something new that you are discovering?

NK: It just happened, like obviously when it happened in Stuttgart, the racial abuse, and then it happened to (Naomi) Osaka in Indian Wells, where somebody yelled, it affected their match. I just don’t understand why viewers feel like they can do that.

Reporter: Can you share with us any details of what they told you?

NL: Pure disrespect, anything. As if someone had just yelled that he was screwed in the crowd today. That’s normal? No. But I just don’t understand why it happens over and over again.

Reporter: You usually love this tournament…

NK: No, I love this tournament. It has nothing to do with Wimbledon. I just think it’s a whole generation of people who feel that on social media they have the right to comment on everything negatively. It just continues in real life.

Because there’s a fence there, and physically I can’t do anything or say anything because I’d get in trouble. They feel the need to be able to say what they want.

Reporter: On the other hand, they heard you today, you were having a little interaction with the linesmen. At one point I think you said, “You’re 90 years old, you can’t see the ball.”

NK: No, I said most referees are older, and I just don’t think that’s ideal when you play a sport with such small margins. In fact, younger people have better eyesight. Don’t you think it’s appropriate?

When you play a sport for hundreds and thousands of dollars, don’t you think we should have people who are really ready to call or get the ball out?

Reporter: However, is it a matter of age?

NK: Actually, does anyone have better eyesight when they’re younger?

Reporter: Not necessarily.

NK: What do you mean ‘not necessarily’ (laughs)? What does it mean? What do you mean ‘not necessarily’?

Reporter: I don’t know.

NK: That specific thing, I hit a ball inside, the old man yelled it out, I was inside. So arguably if the guy was 40 years old, he might not have said that.

Reporter: But he may be 60 years old and he may have 20/20 vision, you don’t know that.

NK: In this case you made the wrong call.

Reporter: Young people take a call badly, right?

NK: It’s okay. I don’t understand the question though.

Reporter: Can you elaborate on the whole social media thing? Do other players share your fears? What would you like Wimbledon to do about it?

NK: I didn’t say it so that no one… I’m just giving you an example. I think people, viewers, everyone is quick to negatively put their energy on someone else. And there are no real consequences.

On social media you can criticize someone on social media and there is no real consequence. Now, whether it’s racial abuse or just plain disrespect, it’s acceptable. But why is that acceptable?

Reporter: If it’s two or three times, then they should say…

NK: I don’t know. As a player who manages very well, I’m getting it in almost every game. I’m playing someone who is… just because they’re sitting there and I can’t do anything, they just feel the need.

Reporter: Has any authority taken out a fan in any of your matches?

NK: Yes, a couple of times.

Reporter: Do you have any sympathy for what happens with the line judges, for example? Do you have any sympathy for how players sometimes treat them, for example? Referees take it, linesmen take it.

NK: It goes beyond that because if I lose a tennis match and it’s a call, they’re not abused on social media. I have to deal with it. My girlfriend deals with hate messages. My family deals with hate messages. I deal with hate mail.

Where, for example, that time in Miami when Carlos Bernardes did that and the whole game turned. Was he dealing with the repercussions? I still deal with it. They just carry on as if nothing happened. They’re back refereeing, refereeing.

For me, the hate messages carry much more weight than that. That’s what people don’t understand. It’s not just, Oh, he made a bad call, and I’m just abusing the referee. I’m frustrated.

If I lose this match, you have no idea how much abuse I have to go through, where the referees don’t go through anything. What do they go through?

Reporter: However, do you have any sympathy for them?

NK: Yeah, if I serve 220 and it hits him, I’m sorry. Are you okay? If they make a bad call, I just focus on one line, why would I have sympathy for that? There are hundreds of thousands of dollars at stake. Why would I have sympathy for that? Has no sense.

Reporter: May I ask, at the end you seemed to spit in the direction of…?

NK: From one of the people who disrespected me. Yes.

Reporter: So that was deliberate?

NK: Yes. I wouldn’t be doing that to someone who was supporting me.

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